HOW TO CALCULATE DIN

What is DIN setting?

DIN stands for Deutsches Institut für Normung (German Institute for Standardization), which is a scale of the release force settings for ski bindings. The standards are currently regulated by law and published by the International Standards Organisation (ISO 11088, the last correction from 2018).

How to adjust ski bindings? First, a specialist technician should apply the DIN setting chart. You ought not to try to fix them yourself, as incorrect adjustment might lead to severe knee injuries while skiing. Our calculator is for informative purposes only.

Why are ski bindings so important?

Moving is good; it helps us lose some pounds, reduce our risk of cardiovascular disease, and increases your mood. However, the proper adjustment of ski bindings is the key to safe skiing ⛷️. With this calculator, you can set your safe release force. And once you fall on the slope, the skies detach themselves from your skiing boots. You may ask: why is that? Well, it is so your leg doesn't stay trapped in an unnatural position, pulled to the side by the ski. This may lead to a skiing injury, most commonly a knee ligament rupture, or even some bone fracturing inside that joint.

Ski bindings and release force

Release force works in two ways:

  1. If there is a big twisting force, the boot releases sideways.
  2. If there is a significant forward force on the boot - the ski boot will be released upwards.

You will need to correctly asses your current weight so that your skis react properly to sharp movements. If you're a good skier with a lot of experience, have made the proper preparations, and you want to go fast, you will need to set a higher DIN value. This is so your boots will not be released on big turns.

Children younger than nine years old and people older than 50 have more fragile bones, and are therefore more prone to fractures. Because of this, their DIN settings need to be lower (so that the boot releases after only minor twisting).

DIN Calculator - How to Adjust Ski Bindings?